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Odds and Probabilities in Poker

One of the most popular games you’ll find at any online casino UK is Texas Hold’em poker.

Rather than blind luck like with some casino games, Hold’em relies on skill, wit and the ability to read your opponent in order to secure victory. Luck is supplemented by an improved application of strategy. The other thing you need is a sharp mind and a head for maths in order to give yourself the maximum edge over your opponents.

Some of the key statistics to remember is that the odds of getting any given combination of cards is 0.45%, so holding out for a pair of Aces for every hand is inadvisable. The odds of getting one of the stronger hands (a pair of Aces, pair of Lings, Ace-King suited) is around 2%, so when you do get one of these, it’s a special occasion.

The pairs in particular are good because the odds of getting one of them from any given hand is about 1.28:1. If you start with one you’re well on your way to Two-Pair or even a Full House, if the right cards come out.
The suited Ace-King combination is a bit of a longer shot; the odds of a Royal Flush are about 30,939:1! But with two cards already dealt it’s still possible!
For more odds and probabilities we came across this handy graphic from Betfair that we think is well worth studying in order to get one up on any of your opponents that haven’t put time into learning:

Odds and Probabilities in Poker

 

pair of aces in omaha poker

Keep Ace Cool!

Having a pair of aces in your hand when starting a game of Omaha is cool. However, you need to remember how dramatically the flop can change your hand. If you have multiple opponents and a flop like 9 10 J, and your opponents are busy raising and re-raising, it’s tempting to continue in the hand, even if it’s a dangerous flop that may have helped your opponents.

Try to remember that Omaha hands really begin on the flop and to act accordingly. That way you won’t be tempted to continue with a big pair that looked strong pre-flop especially if the flop doesn't help.

Read more about Robert Turner and how he introduced Omaha poker into casinos.